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Dietary Confusion

Bread Choices

Healthy Eating

For the full recipes and more information on the

role of bread in a sensible, balanced diet visit

www.agrainoftruth.com.au

1. Healthy Diet Study. Galaxy Research. 2014

2. Australian Grains and Legumes Consumption

and Attitudinal Study. GLNC. 2014

(published November 2014)

3. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Health Survey: Nutrition First Results – Foods and Nutrients, 2011-12. ABS Cat No 4364.0.55.007. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2014. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/

Lookup/4364.0.55.007main+features22011-12

4. Values obtained by GLNC using FoodWorks Professional, FoodWorks 7

4. Williams PG, Grafenauer SJ, and O’Shea JE. Cereal grains, legumes, and weight management: a comprehensive review of the scientific evidence. Nutrition Reviews. 2008;66(4):171-82 http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1092&context=hbspapers

Mozaffarian D, Hao T, Rimm ER, Willett WC, Hu FB.

5. Changes in diet and lifestyle and long-term weight gain in women and men. NEJM. 2011;1364:2392-2404

6. Du H et al. Dietary fiber and subsequent changes in body weight and waist circumference in European men and women. Am J Clin Nutr 2010;91:329-36.

7.http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/91/2/329.full.pdf

8. de la Hunty, A. & Ashwell M. 2007, "Are people who regularly eat breakfast cereals slimmer than those who don't? A systematic review of the evidence", Nutrition Bulletin, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 118-128. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-3010.2007.00638.x/abstract

9. Australian Grains and Legumes Consumption and Attitudinal Study. GLNC. 2014 (published November 2014)

Healthy Diet Study. Galaxy Research. 2014

10. Dr Joanna McMillan Plate Model 2014

11. Some products may contain molasses or honey 12.Based on Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council Product Audit of 104 packaged loaf breads (includes white, wholemeal and multigrain, excludes gluten free) sold in the Woolworths bread aisle, conducted January 2016.

13. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Catalogue no: 43640DO010_20112012 Australian Health Survey: Nutrition First Results – Foods and Nutrients, 2011–12 — Australia Table 10.13 (Category Regular breads, and bread rolls (plain/unfilled/untopped varieties)

 

Brought to you by

21 October 2014 (Sydney, Australia) -­‐ New researchi shows that Australians are a nation of confused eaters, who lack the confidence and knowledge to choose healthy everyday staples for themselves and their families.

 

Dr Joanna McMillan, Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council (GLNC) and Tip Top Bakeries have joined forces to help bust common myths and encourage the nation to embrace a sensible, long-­‐term approach to healthy eating.

 

The Healthy Diet Study -­‐ Galaxy Research 2014, which surveyed over 1,000 Australians aged 18 – 64 revealed that 87% of us are confused when it comes to eating healthily, thanks mainly to conflicting information about what comprises healthy food (59%)ii.

 

This uncertainty about making healthy food choices leaves more than half (53%) feeling concerned about some of the food they eat. But, the overwhelming sentiment of 70% of people is the need for consistent reliable information that can be trustediii.

 

The most popular source of dietary advice is friends and family, and the vast majority of us have never consulted a doctor (57%) or a dietitian (74%) about what we eativ.

 

Fuelled by mixed messages and fads, we are turning to quick fixes in a bid to shift kilos, and invariably cut carbs, including bread. Yet, by shunning bread, Australian adults and children could be missing out on sources of fibre, whole grains and protein -­‐ essential for health and long-­‐term weight management.

 

Georgie Aley, Managing Director of GLNC says, “Largely as a result of carb cutting attitudes, Australians claim they are eating less bread than three years ago -­‐ in 2011 72% of us ate bread daily, in 2014 this has dropped to 65%v. Through history, bread has been one of the main sources of grain and fibre in Australia. Alarmingly, 75% of Australians don’t eat enough whole grains in their dietvi. Bread is packed full of essential nutrients and can be an excellent source of whole grains in the diet.”

 

Practising Accredited Dietitian, Dr Joanna McMillan says, “The confusion highlighted in this research has lead to a nation who wrongly believe that carb cutting alone is the answer to healthy eating. Bread is an everyday staple that has been at the heart of family mealtimes for millennia, yet over recent years consumption has declined significantly. If this was being replaced with healthy whole grain alternatives there wouldn’t be an issue – but it is making way for ‘snacks’ that are perceived as health foods yet may be anything but.”

 

The study also found that only 37% of Australians consider bread to be a healthy daily staple, yet there is wide spread confusion about what bread actually contains. While 93% of Australians understand that everyday sliced bread contains carbohydrate, there is also a mistaken and widely held belief that it contains added sugar (67%). In addition, the majority of people (67%) don’t know that bread contains protein – which to many people’s surprise can make it part of a lower carbohydrate, high protein weight loss dietvii.

 

The A Grain of Truth campaign from Tip Top Bakeries and supported by Dr Joanna McMillan and GLNC is calling on Australians to farewell the fads and go back to the smart basics. This means making sure that meals consist of real foods and include a healthy balance of all the key food groups; plants, proteins, smart carbs and good fats.

 

Based on Dr Joanna McMillan’s plate model, the Perfectly Balanced Sandwich Method makes it easy to create a quick and delicious meal for all the family, with a balance of all the key food groups our bodies need to function optimally.

 

Dr Joanna explains, “When choosing an everyday sliced bread from the supermarket, they fall into good, better and best categories -­‐ but it is important to remember that all bread has nutritional value and benefits. Bread is an ancient food, made from grain, which is a plant food. Obesity is a recent issue, and blaming bread alone for weight-­‐gain is misguided. Cutting it out completely is a reflection of the confusion people are facing in making food choices.”

 

Georgie Aley adds, “Part of the problem is the trend of the ‘anti-­‐expert’ -­‐ people are relying on family members, chefs, personal trainers and bloggers alone for dietary advice, are following fad diets and taking extreme measures as they look for quick fixes and instant gratification. GLNC recommends following the guidance of an accredited practising dietitian regarding a healthy, balanced diet and looking for a long-­‐term, sensible approach to eating.”

 

Tip Top Bakeries has been putting bread on the tables of Australian families for over 50 years and bakes over one million loaves fresh every day.

 

Graeme Cutler from Tip Top Bakeries, says, “This research shows there is widespread confusion, not just about what constitutes healthy eating, but about what goes into everyday sliced bread. Bread is a source of fibre and other nutrients essential for healthy eating. Bread also contains protein and contrary to common belief, white bread contains no added sugar. So whether it’s white bread, multigrain, wholemeal or whole grain, or even gluten free, there is a bread available to suit everyone.”

 

For more information on farewelling fads, cutting through mixed messages and choosing a healthy, balanced diet, consumers should visit www.agrainoftruth.com.au and can join in the conversation using #agrainoftruth

 

For further information or to arrange an interview with campaign spokespeople, please contact:

DEC PR for Tip Top Bakeries

Brittany Connor / Sarah Bullen / Sarah-­‐Ann Brittain

(02) 8014 5033

tiptop@decpr.com.au

 

About Tip Top Bakeries

Tip Top Bakeries has been proudly baking for Australian families for over 50 years and launched the first national bread brand in Australia. Tip Top's pre-­‐sliced, wrapped bread revolutionised the baking category in Australia in the 1950s. Over the years, the range of breads and baked goods from Tip Top Bakeries has expanded to cater for the developing needs of Australian families. Tip Top Bakeries is part of George Weston Foods (GWF Group) which includes brands such as Tip Top®, Bürgen® and Abbott’s Village Bakery®.

 

Tip Top employees more than 4,000 people and produces over 1million loaves of bread every day and delivers its products to more than 18,000 locations.

 

About Dr Joanna McMillan

Dr Joanna McMillan is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and completed a PhD with The University of Sydney in 2006. Dr Joanna is the founder of Get Lean, a regular on the Nine Network and the official nutritionist for TODAY. She is also the author of several books, has a weekly column in Sunday Life and is a blogger for Woolworths Baby & Toddler Club. Her other roles include Vice President of the Australian Lifestyle Medicine Association (ALMA) and Ambassador for Diabetes Australia.

 

About Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council

The Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council is the independent authority on the nutrition and health benefits of grains and legumes. GLNC promotes grains and legumes nutrition as part of a balanced diet through evidence-­‐based information cultivating good health.

 

i  Healthy Diet Study, Galaxy Research, August 2014 (conducted online among a sample of 1,014 Australians aged 18-­‐64 years)

ii  Healthy Diet Study, Galaxy Research, August 2014

iii  Healthy Diet Study, Galaxy Research, August 2014

iv  Healthy Diet Study, Galaxy Research, August 2014

v Australian Grains and Legumes Consumption and  Attitudinal Study. GLNC. 2014 (released November 2014)

vi Australian Grains and Legumes Consumption and Attitudinal Study. GLNC. 2014 (released November 2014)

vii  Healthy Diet Study, Galaxy Research, August 2014

 

Media Releases

Australians confused and ill-equipped to choose a healthy balanced diet

Dr Joanna McMillan's Plate Model

A healthy, balanced diet consists of real foods with a healthy balance of all the key food groups; plants, proteins, smart carbs and good fats.14

Non-Starchy Vegies & Fruit

baby spinach, beetroot, cucumber

Fish, Seafood, Meat, Legumes, Dairy

poached chicken, yogurt dill dressing

Legumes, Grains & Starchy Vegies

whole grain bread

Extra Virgin olive oil, Avocado, Nuts & Seeds

hummus

Plant food

Plant food

Dr Joanna McMillan's Plate Model

Protein-rich foods

Protein-rich foods

Smart carbs

Smart carbs

Healthy fat-rich food

Healthy fat-rich food

A SLICE OF REALITY ABOUT

A HEALTHY DIET

Method

 

1. Mix a tb of natural yoghurt with a tsp of finely chopped dill, a squeeze of lemon and freshly ground black pepper.

 

2. Spread one slice of bread with hummus. Top with spinach, sliced beetroot, finely sliced cucumber, shredded poached chicken and drizzle with the yoghurt dill dressing. Finish with another slice of bread. Cut diagonally in half and enjoy! Serve with a generous helping of salad.

 

TIP: If taking this sandwich to work, put the yoghurt dressing in a separate small pot, keep chilled and add just before eating. No one likes a soggy sandwich!

 

Method

 

1. Shred or chop the poached chicken finely. Grate an apple with the skin on. Mix the chicken and grated apple with a little olive oil mayo.

 

2. Make your sandwich with a cos lettuce leaf on the bottom, then top with the chicken apple mixture and the second slice of bread. Cut into quarters.

 

3. Slice a carrot into batons and serve alongside the sandwich.

 

If your kids won’t eat too many vegies in a sandwich, giving them vegie sticks on the side is a good way to get them to nibble on them separately.

 

Ingredients

 

1 large onion, skin on, roughly chopped

2 celery stalks with leaves, roughly chopped

2 large carrots, roughly chopped

3 bay leaves bunch parsley stalks, roughly chopped

a bunch of spring onion ends, the dark part, roughly chopped

5 thyme stalks

bulb of garlic, skin on

whole fresh free range chicken, trimmed of excess fat around the cavity

1 tb salt

 

 

Method

 

1. In a large stock pot add all your ingredients, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook gently for at least 1 1/2 hours, skimming the liquid of froth and oil every so often. For a deeper flavour cook for 3 hours.

 

2. Drain the stock through a sieve and refrigerate. Once cold the fat will solidify on the top, and then remove this.

 

3. Remove the poached chicken from the bones, shred and store in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two days. Or of course you can add back to the stock to make a fabulous chicken soup.

 

Poached Chicken

Did you know?

Why Whole Grains?

Bread contains Protein as well as Carbohydrates?

Bread contains No Added Sugar

1. Bran - dense in fibre

 

2. Endosperm - contains fibre and nutrients

 

3. Germ - contains fibre and nutrients

 

- Made using just the endosperm of a wheat grain

- White colour is because the brown outer layers of the wheat are removed

- Not bleached

 

- Made using all three parts of the wheat grain

- Brown colour comes from the brans layer

- A whole grain food

- Contains more fibre and has a lower GI

 

Breaking down wheat

White Flour

Wholemeal Flour

Whole grain foods contain the same amount of each part of the grain as a fully intact grain, so all the essential nutrients are retained

To choose bread that is higher in whole grain and fibre, look for labels like:

 

Contains Whole Grain    -    High in Whole Grain    -    Very High in Whole Grain

Grain-based foods, both whole grains and refined, make an important contribution to the nutrient intake of Australians. Their role in a healthy diet goes beyond merely the provision of nutrients. There is now strong and growing evidence that regular consumption of grain-based foods, specifically whole grains, play an important role in disease protection. Find out more by visiting the Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council - the independent authority on the nutrition and health benefits of grains and legumes.

With so many options available, choosing bread in the supermarket can feel overwhelming. This guide explains the differences between popular breads to help you decide which is the best loaf for your family.

Which

bread is right

for you?

- Made with white flour

- Added intact grain pieces

- Made with white flour

- White flour is not bleached

TIP: Look for fibre and vitamin-enriched, lower GI varieties to keep you fuller for longer

 

- Made with wholemeal flour

- A whole grain product

- Contains more fibre

TIP: Choose wholemeal flour to increase your whole grain intake.

 

- Made with wholemeal flour

- Added intact grain pieces

- Contains more fibre

TIP: Choose wholemeal flour to

increase your whole grain intake.

 

White bread

and grains

White bread

Wholemeal bread

Wholemeal bread and whole grains

The healthy diet study (galaxy research 2014) shows that mixed messages, fad diets and sensationalist health claims are leading to a nation of confused eaters. So what impact is this having and what can we do about it?

-87% of us are confused when it comes to eating healthily.1

-This uncertainty leaves 53% of us feeling concerned about some of the food we eat.1

-59% of Australians find information about what comprises healthy  food to be conflicting.1

-70% want consistent, reliable information about a healthy diet that can be trusted.1

 

-Friends and family are the most popular source of dietary advice (50%).1

-74% have never consulted a dietitian about diet.1

-57% have never consulted a doctor1 about diet.1

 

-With trends like paleo and clean-eating making the headlines, we’re cutting carbs in a bid to shift the kilos.

-Bread consumption has declined over the last three years from 72% of us eating it daily to 65%.2

-63% of Australians do not consider bread to be a healthy daily staple.1

-67% of people mistakenly believe that bread contains added sugar.1

 

-Bread gives us more fibre than any other food and is the leading contributor of fibre in Australian diets.3 Without grain foods, we would have to eat 1.1kg (which is 9 serves of veg and 3 serves of fruit) every day to get 25g of fibre.4

-75% of Australians don’t eat enough whole grains in their diet.7

-Numerous scientific studies show that eating whole grains and high-fibre foods help with long-term weight management.4, 5, 6, 7

-67% of people don’t know that bread also contains protein!10

 

A Grain of Truth

about Australia's

dietary confusion

If you are feeling unsure,

you are not alone

Despite this confusion,

we're ignoring the

experts

We're cutting carbs in a

bid for quick fixes

We're missing out on lots

of goodness

Bread has no added sugar 11,12

Bread has valuable plant proteins 12

Bread gives us more fibre than any other food group 13

Our much loved regular bread has been a dietary staple for most of humankind. It contributes more fibre than any other food group, plant proteins that are necessary as part of a balanced diet, as well as vitamins and minerals. And it has no added sugar. So enjoy your bread - it’s all good.11

Watch Dr Joanna McMillan as she busts common myths about bread and shares her tips for making quick & nutritious sandwiches for all the family.

The Truth

Dr Joanna McMillan

Research (Healthy Diet Study, Galaxy Research, 2014) shows that Australians are a nation of confused eaters, who lack the confidence and knowledge to choose healthy every day staples for them and their families. Fueled by mixed messages and fads, we are also looking for quick fixes in a bid to shift kilos. A Grain of Truth is about farewelling the fads and embracing a sensible, long-term approach to healthy eating by going back to basics. Here you will find interesting facts about bread and whole grains, and how they form an essential part of a sensible approach to healthy eating. You can also meet Dr Joanna McMillan and discover her Perfectly Balanced Sandwich recipes, making it quick and easy to create a delicious, balanced meal for the whole family. There’s also a guide to choosing the right bread for you.

Welcome to A Grain of Truth

Poached Chicken

sandwich with

salad, humus &

yogurt dill

dressing

Children's

sandwich

poached chicken and apple mayo

Poached Chicken Sandwich with salad, hummus & yogurt dill dressing

Children's Sandwich - poached chicken & apple mayo

Dr Joanna McMillan’s

perfectly balanced

sandwich method helps

you to create a quick and

delicious meal with a

balance of all the key

food groups our bodies

need to function

optimally.